With over 220 million speakers in 29 countries on five continents, French plays a significant role in the global economy and culture, and in the sciences. Our French and Francophone Studies classes prepare students for a broad range of international engagements, including participation in programs such as MISTI France, Belgium and Switzerland, MIT-Africa, MIT-Middle East and January Scholars in France.

The French and Francophone Studies curriculum offers opportunities to all students from the elementary level to the most advanced courses, spanning language, literature, intercultural studies, critical theory, French politics and society, gender and queer studies, French history, film studies, visual culture, Francophone African Studies, and cultural anthropology. The diversity of course offerings and the personal attention in small group classes create engaging and rewarding experiences for each student.

Subjects in French Studies may be applied to the French major, minor, or Concentration. Learn more about the French program requirements at the Academic Programs page. Advisors for these programs are below. Students uncertain what level of French language to take should refer to placement information. Information on transfer credit is available here.

French Minor/Major: Catherine Clark
French Concentration: Eva Dessein
Global Languages French Studies group: Cathy Culot | Leanna Rezvani | Isadora Nicholas | Eva Dessein

Fall 2022

21G.301/351 French I
21G.302/352 French II
21G.303 French III
21G.304 French IV
21G.308 Writing (like the) French
21G.312 Basic Themes in French Literature and Culture
21G.049 French Photography
21G.344 French Feminist Literature: Yesterday and Today
21G.348 Global Paris

21G.312 Basic Themes in French Literature and Culture: Le monde de Lupin: The Netflix Series
In this course, students will further master French speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing skills by watching Netflix’s hit television series « Lupin » and reading excerpts of Maurice Leblanc’s detective novels on which it is based.

IAP 2023

21G.301/351 French I

Spring 2023

21G.301/351 French I
21G.302/352 French II
21G.303 French III
21G.304 French IV
21G.310 French Conversation: Intensive Practice
21G.312 Basic Themes in French Literature and Culture
21G.320 Introduction to French Literature
21G.342 French Pop Music
21G.346 Topics in Modern French Literature and Culture
21G.056/356 The "Making" of Modern Europe: 1789 to Present

21G.312 Basic Themes in French Literature and Culture: A Tour of Belgium in 80 days
The main objective of this course is to gain a better understanding of contemporary Belgium through an exploration of Belgian culture with a study of Belgium’s history and its successes in various areas including the arts and international politics. Readings and group discussions will help students increase their oral and written communication skills and put their findings in a historical and sociopolitical context. Topics such as Belgian history, Belgian colonization, Art Nouveau, comic strips, the European Union, Belgian surrealism and Belgian literature among others will be explored. Taught in French.

21G.320 Introduction to French Literature
A study of major French literary genres and an introduction to methods of literary analysis. This semester, students will be part of the jury for the Goncourt Prize USA. “Le Goncourt” is the most prestigious literary prize in France. Students will study and rank books from the Goncourt shortlist. They will elect a representative to present their selection at the Villa Albertine in New York and choose the winner along with students from Princeton, Duke, Yale, Harvard, Columbia, and the University of Virginia. Meanwhile, the other students will prepare a press article to present their experience as a jury! Authors studied: Grégoire Bouillier, Nathan Devers, Guiliano da Empoli, Brigitte Giraud, Cloé Korman, Makenzy Orcel, Pascale Robert-Diard, and Monica Sabolo. Special attention is devoted to the improvement of French language skills. Taught in French.

21G.346 Topics in Modern French Literature and Culture: Exploring Contemporary French Crime Genre
French readers are voracious consumers of crime fiction, also known as POLAR – a shortening of roman policier. Beyond solving the mystery and the procedure of whodunit, crime stories can offer a broad and deep investigation of society and culture. n this course, we will read popular French works of fiction, watch films and listen to podcasts set in France to analyze what this genre can reveal of modern French society.

 

A note regarding the enrollment policy of the Global Languages: Enrollment limited to 18 for pedagogical reasons. Preference will be given to pre-registered students, including pre-registered undergraduates who were cut from the same class the previous semester due to the enrollment cap. Please note that you have to attend the first day of class to maintain your preference level. In case of over-enrollment, preference will be given in the following order: declared majors, declared minors, declared concentrators, first-years, sophomores, juniors, seniors and graduate students.